January 14, 2010

Google says "FU Communist Party of China".


No company or person should ever compromise their firm moral beliefs for the sake of a buck. Or a renminbi.

Realtors, hookers and Wal-Mart shoppers do it every day. But nice to see the guys at Google (finally) have some moral spine. "Don't be evil" they said. Just took 'em some time.

I heart Google. Sadly a voice in the wilderness though, as US corporations, the US government and the American people whore themselves out to the paranoid and corrupt leaders of China every day.

14 comments:

Deucebag said...

So, are you saying that I should look up to that foul smelling urine soaked homeless dude with the maggots growing from his foot because he refuses to work for the man?

Anonymous said...

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/15/business/economy/15panel.html?partner=rss&emc=rss

Panel Told of F.B.I. Efforts to Fight Financial Crime

Off topic again, but looks like you can start the counter back up for Angleo Mozzilo's arrest...among others.

Anonymous said...

"No company or person should ever compromise their firm moral beliefs for the sake of a buck. Or a renminbi."
Yeah, at least you can say that while you're young and fresh-faced and making a lot of money and your company hasn't closed down, like so many seem to do eventually.

ghpacific said...

Check out "Young & Restless in China" documentary and you will hear a Chinese businessman explain that corruption and bribery are considered integral to Chinese business practices (remember the melamine milk that poisoned their own customers for profit maximization) and for any Western business to succeed there, they need to abandon all notions of fair play. That's why all Western business attempts are being gamed in China, no matter what anyone thinks.

say no to drugs said...

maybe baidu wants them out so they can make huge profits?

Thomas said...

Good for Google! I'm sure that Sergey's childhood experiences in the USSR helped him to stick to his principles and overcome the "money issue."

This was clearly a large scale government-sponsored operation (over 20 U.S. high-tech companies were targeted) and only part of
an ongoing corporate espionage program originating from China.

I'm sure MicroShit was on the list too, but as usual bent over and said that their mail properties were secure and not compromised.
The coming depression will help the business-whores see that principles matter.

Anonymous said...

hey,

Its a start

patrat said...

F Yu and the horse Yu rode in on.

Anonymous said...

Keith:
Grow up.
See the bigger picture. This is sheer protectionism. Japan practiced the same in the early 70's and 80's and they do even today.
When the times are bad more Countries will resort to protectionism.

Jim

ghpacific said...

http://shanghaiist.com/2010/01/14/what_baidu_will_look_like_once_goog.php

anon916 said...

Well, hate to say it, but probably not much support from the Muslim nations when it it comes to Haiti support. I''m just sayin'....

Lost Cause said...

Good. Next they can work on getting the CIA out of their American offices.

nasty midnighter said...

Homeboy: If Google hadn't "detected a highly sophisticated and targeted attack on our corporate infrastructure originating from China," it wouldn't have altered its policy of censoring search results to fit the wishes of the Chinese. It was the attack, not a sudden burst of righteousness, that spurred this action. Don't "heart" Google for this.

Anonymous said...

Thought this, from Wikipedia, was interesting:

"In 2006, when Google declared their self-censorship move into China, their "Don't be evil" motto was somewhat replaced with an "evil scale" balancing system, allowing smaller evils for a greater good..."

"Chris Hoofnagle agrees [7] that Google's original intention expressed by the "don't be evil" motto is linked to the company's separation of search results from advertising. However, he argues that clearly separating search results from sponsored links is required by law, thus, Google's practice is now mainstream and no longer remarkable or good. According to Hoofnagle, Google should abandon the motto because:
The evil talk is not only an albatross for Google, it obscures the substantial consumer benefits from Google’s advertising model. Because we have forgotten the original context of Google’s evil representations, the company should remind the public of the company’s contribution to a revolution in search advertising, and highlight some overlooked benefits of their model."